Email: msearcy@byu.edu
Office: 862 SWKT
Phone: 801-422-5374
Personal Page
Mike Searcy, Assistant Professor

Department: Anthropology

Vita

Education

  • Anthropology, University of Oklahoma, 2010
  • Anthropology, Brigham Young University, 2005
  • Journallism, University of North Texas, 2000

Research Interests

Viejo (AD 700-1200) and Medio Periods (AD 1200-1450) of the Casas Grandes tradition of northwest Mexico; causes linked to transitions in sociopolitical organization and in shifting identities; long-distance interaction; iconographical analysis; ground stone analysis; ethnoarchaeology; Fremont archaeology; UAVs/drones.

Awards

  • Butler Young Scholar Award in Western Studies, Charles Redd Center for Western Studies, 2018

Professional Affiliations

  • Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society
  • Utah Professional Archaeological Council

Publication Info

  • Michael T Searcy, Jane Kelley (2016). The Viejo Period. Discovering Paquimé.
  • Michael T Searcy (2016). Dealing with Legal Uncertainty in the Use of UAVs in the United States. SAA Archaeological Record.
  • Gerardo Gutierrez, Michael T Searcy (2016). Introduction to the UAV Special Edition. SAA Archaeological Record.
  • Eric H Christiansen, R. K. Talbot, Michael T Searcy, S. M. Ure, L. D. Richens (2015). Obsidian Crossroads: An Archaeological investigation of the Panaca Summit/Modena obsidian source in Lincoln County, Nevada. Technical Series No. 15-1.
  • Jane Kelley, Michael T Searcy (2015). Beginnings: The Viejo Period. Ancient Paquimé and the Casas Grandes World.
  • Michael T Searcy (2014). Cultural and Contextual Differentiation of Mesoamerican Iconography in the U.S. Southwest/Northwest Mexico. Building Transnational Archaeologies: 11th Southwest Symposium.
  • Michael T Searcy, Felicity Warren (2014). A Real Indiana Jones. Insight.
  • Michael T Searcy, Todd A Pitezel (2013). Understanding the Viejo Period: What Are the Data? Collected Papers from the 17th Biennial Mogollon Archaeology Conference.
  • Michael T Searcy (2011). The Life-giving Stone: Ethnoarchaeology of Maya Metates.