Blake Jones, Assistant Professor

Department: Psychology

Vita

Email: blakejones@byu.edu

Office: 1092 KMBL

Phone: 801-422-6363

Bio

After high school, I came to BYU with plans to become a pediatrician. Along the way, I started to do research with BYU faculty and developed a passion for research that seeks to understand how human behavior is related to health and well-being. I changed course and went to graduate school at Purdue University, where I completed my M.S. degree studying how temperament and personality influence helping children's behaviors.
After Purdue, I worked for the State of Indiana Department of Child Services as a family case manager for a year and a half. Then I came back to BYU from 2007-2010, where I completed my Ph.D. studying emotional regulation and perceptual development in young children, as well as how parental work roles influence health and well-being in the family. From 2010-2013 I was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where I was mentored by Dr. Barbara Fiese, an expert in how daily family routines influence children's health and well-being. Then in 2013 I returned to Purdue University as an assistant professor. After five wonderful years at Purdue I was offered a position at BYU, where I am now privileged to be an assistant professor in Psychology.

Education

  • PhD in Marriage, Family, and Human Development from Brigham Young University, 2010
  • Master of Science in Child Development and Family Studies from Purdue University, 2006
  • Bachelor of Science in Marriage, Family, and Human Development from Brigham Young University, 2002

Research Interests

My research program addresses the influence of daily routines and behaviors on health and well-being. Specifically, I am interested in how daily routines such as family mealtimes, bedtime routines, media use, and parental work schedules are associated with obesity, sleep problems, and hypertension in children and adolescents. I am also interested in identifying how physiological stress, psychological stress, and hormones influence the relationship between routines and health outcomes.

Awards

  • Faculty Mentor selected for Service Learning Grant Award ($900) from Purdue University,
  • Finalist for 'Favorite Faculty Award' (campus wide program) from Purdue University,
  • Cluster Hire Community Building Award ($15,000) from Purdue University,
  • 1st Place Graduate Student Poster Award (prize $300) from Mary Lou Fulton Conference - Brigham Young University,
  • Blaine R. Porter Doctoral Scholar Award ($3,000) from Brigham Young University,
  • Graduate Student Excellence Scholarship ($850) from Brigham Young University,
  • Graduate Studies Travel Award ($400) from Brigham Young University,
  • Mary Lou Fulton Research Mentor Award ($5,000) from Brigham Young University,
  • Blaine R. Porter Doctoral Scholar Award ($3,000) from Brigham Young University,
  • Graduate Student Excellence Scholarship ($1,000) from Brigham Young University,
  • Graduate Studies Travel Award ($500) from Brigham Young University,
  • Mary Lou Fulton Research Mentor Award ($5,000) from Brigham Young University,

Professional Affiliations

  • National Council on Family Relations (NCFR)