Brent Slife, Professor

Department: Psychology

Vita

Email: brent_slife@byu.edu

Office: 1072 SWKT

Phone: 801-422-3657

Website

Bio

Dr. Slife is the Richard L. Evans Chair of Religious Understanding and Professor of Psychology at Brigham Young University. He has been honored recently with BYU’s highest faculty award, the Karl G. Maeser Distinguished Lecturer, as well as the American Psychological Association Presidential Citation for his contribution to psychology. He has also served as the President of the Society of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology and is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the APA Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology and the editor of the Routledge book series in theoretical and philosophical psychology. He has authored or co-authored over 200 articles and 10 books, and continues his psychotherapy practice of over 30 years where he specializes in marital and family therapies.

Research Interests

I am both a clinical and theoretical psychologist. My interests encompass the theoretical underpinnings of psychotherapy and scientific methodology, and my current research involves two basic elements. The first element asks the somewhat novel question, at least in psychology: what if God truly mattered in the theory, research, and practice of psychology? The second element is the exploration of a relational ontology for psychotherapy and psychology in general. This second interest also entails theory, research, and practice on a new way of thinking about human nature as well as the good life, both vital topics in psychotherapy.

Awards

  • Fellow of APA Division 5, Quantitative and Qualitative Psychology from American Psychological Association, 2017
  • Karl G. Maeser, Distinguished Lecturer from Brigham Young University, 2016
  • Richard L Evans Chair of Religious Understanding from Brigham Young University, 2016
  • Alumni Professorship Award for Outstanding Teaching and Scholarship from Brigham Young University, 2009
  • Eliza R. Snow Fellowship from Brigham Young University, 2007
  • Presidential Citation Award for Contribution to Psychology from American Psychological Association, 2008
  • APA Best Seller - Critical Thinking About Psychology from American Psychological Association Books, 2006
  • Distinguished Visiting Professor from American University of Cairo, Cairo, Egypt, 2006
  • Circle of Honor Award from Student Honor Association, BYU, 2005
  • William James Book Award Nomination from Society of General Psychology, 2005
  • APA Award for Distinguished Service to Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology from American Psychological Association, 2004
  • Karl G. Maesar Award from Brigham Young University, 2002
  • Eliza R. Snow Fellowship from Brigham Young University, 2000
  • Most Outstanding Professor from Psi Chi, 2000
  • President from Society of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology, 1999

Professional Affiliations

  • Society of Evaluation, Measurement & Statistics

Recent Publications

  • Slife, B. D., & Ghelfi, E. (forthcoming). Practical wisdom in psychotherapy and religion: Abstractionist versus relational accounts. Psychology in China.
  • Slife, B. D., & Ghelfi, E. (forthcoming). Psychotherapy and scientism: Scientism and Psychology. New York: Routledge Publications.
  • Slife, B. D. (2017). The experience of love and the limits of psychological explanation.. In Brigham Young University Studies (pp. 79-92).
  • Slife, B. D. (2017). Strong relationality and hermeneutic realism. In Dialogues at the edge of American psychological discourse: Critical and theoretical perspectives. New York: Palgrave.
  • Slife, B. D., Martin, G., & Sasser, S. (2017). A prominent worldview of professional psychology: Its assumptions and its practices.. In Hidden worldviews in psychology. Routledge Publications.
  • Slife, B. D., & O'Grady, K. (2017). A prominent worldview of psychological research: Methodology and practice. Hidden worldviews in psychology.
  • Slife, B. D., & O'Grady, K. (2017). Hidden worldviews in psychology. In . New York: Routledge Publications.
  • Slife, B. D. (2017). Human frailty, vice, and suffering: Flourishing in the context of limits and dependency. In . Washington, D.C.: APA Books.
  • Slife, B. D. (2016). Using operational definitions in research: A best practices approach. Journal of Mind and Behavior.
  • Slife, B. D. (2016). Theorizing inquiry in the moral space of practice.. Qualitative Research in Psychology.
  • Slife, B. D., Scott, L., & McDonald, A. (2016). The clash of liberal individualism and theism in psychotherapy: A case illustration.. In Open Theology. De Gruyter.
  • Slife, B. D. (2016). Conceptual issues in health and society: Neglected social and relational experiences and care approaches.. In Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology, 36 (2), 61-130 (pp. 61-130). Washington D.C.: APA.
  • Slife, B. D., Johson, C., & Jennings, A. (2015). Surprise and practical rationality: Knowledge advancement through the explication of interpretation: The Wiley handbook of theoretical and philosophical psychology. New York: Wiley.
  • Slife, B. D. (2015). A new vision: Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology. American Psychological Association.
  • Nelson, J., & Slife, B. (forthcoming). Positive psychology and Christian views of the good life. Journal of Positive Psychology, in press.
  • Slife, B. (2014). Foreword. Decide now: The good life or the best life, 9-11.
  • Slife, B. (2014). Naturalism, psychology, and religious experience: An introduction to the special section on psychology and transcendence. Pastoral Psychology, 63(3), 319-322.
  • Slife, B. (2014). Questioning the Presumption of Naturalism in the Social Sciences. Pastoral Psychology, 69, 339-353.
  • Slife, B. (2014). A Theistic Approach to Psychology. Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology, 1940-1947.
  • Slife, B., & Slife, N. M. (2014). Empiricism. In Thomas Teo (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology (pp. 571-578). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Slife, B. (2014). Should the natural sciences get a pass?. First Things.
  • Slife, B. (2014). One of the last of the grand theorists. American Psychologist, 69, 82-83.
  • Slife, B., & Christensen, T. (2013). Hermeneutic realism: Toward a truly meaningful psychology. Review of General Psychology, 17(2), 230-236.
  • Slife, B. (2013). Instructor's manual (to Taking sides: Clashing views on controversial psychological issues), 18th Edition. (18th).
  • Slife, B. (2013). Taking sides: Clashing views on psychological issues.. In Taking sides: Clashing views on psychological issues. (pp. 362). New York: McGraw-Hill.
  • Slife, B. (2013). The educational purpose of the Taking Sides series. Approaching Taking Sides.
  • Slife, B., & Stilson, S. (2013). The rigorous humanist: The Humanistic Psychologist.
  • Reber, J., & Slife, B. (2013). Theistic psychology and the relation of worldviews: A reply to the critics. In Christian Psychology: A Transdisciplinary Journal (pp. 5-20).
  • Richardson, M., & Slife, B. (2013). A “Narrowing of Inquiry” in American Moral Psychology and Education. Journal of Moral Education.
  • Slife, B., & Reber, J. (2012). Conceptualizing Religious Practices in Psychological Research: Problems and Prospects. Pastoral Psychology, 61(5-6), 735-746.
  • Slife, B., Reber, J., & Faulconer, J. (2012). Implicit ontological reasoning: The problems of dualism in psychological science.. In R. Proctor & J. Capaldi (Ed.), Psychology of science: Implicit and explicit processes. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
  • Reber, J., Slife, B., & Sanders, P. (2012). A pluralistic psychology? Only if difference makes a difference. In Edification: The Transdisciplinary Journal of Christian Psychology (pp. 108-112).
  • Slife, B., & Melling, B. (2012). Method decisions: Quantitative and qualitative inquiry in the study of religious phenomena. Pastoral Psychology, 61(5), 721-734.
  • Slife, B. (2012). Virtue ethics in practice: The Greenbrier Academy. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology, 32, 35-42.
  • Reber, J., Slife, B., & Downs, S. (2012). A tale of two theistic studies: Illustrations and evaluation of a potential program of theistic psychological research. Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, 23, 191-212.
  • Slife, B., Reber, J., & LeFevor, G. (2012). When God truly matters: A theistic approach to psychology. Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, 23, 213-237.
  • Slife, B. (2012). Religious implications of Western personality theories: Pastoral Psychology.
  • Slife, B. (2012). Theoretical and epistemological issues in the psychology of religion: Oxford handbook for the psychology of religion. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Slife, B. (2012). Taking Sides: Clashing Views on psychological issues. In (pp. 362). New York: McGraw-Hill.
  • Slife, B., & Richardson, F. C. (2011). Is Gergen’s Relational Being relational enough?. Journal of Constructivist Psychology, 24, 304-313.
  • Slife, B., & Richardson, F. C. (2011). The relativism of social constructionism. Journal of Constructivist Psychology, 24, 333-339.
  • Slife, B., Burchfield, C. M., & Hedges, D. (2010). Interpreting the "biologization" of psychology. Journal of Mind and Behavior, 31(3), 165-178.